23-25 June 2018
Kyoto, Japan
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2018 – Kyoto

Global Reordering: Prospects for Equality, Democracy and Justice

Conference Theme Overview

For decades, scholars have been charting the multiple effects of “globalization” on political, economic and social practices in the developed and developing world. Broadly, globalization has been understood to involve open trade and the growth of transnational flows, linkages and interdependencies at all levels involving knowledge, labor, business, finance, technology, regulation and norms, such as human rights. After World War II, multiple regimes and institutions traversing and interlinking domestic and transnational positions emerged and were then continuously modified to foster and govern the globalization process. For decades, the diffusion of the ideology and practice architectures of “globalization” was made possible by a strong developed capitalist alliance of mostly western powers, headed by the United States. The results of this historical project have been highly uneven: some regions of the global south (especially Asia), experienced tremendous growth and living standard improvement, while others (eg in Africa) languished; the metropolitan north experienced an initial multiple decade period of prosperity followed by ever more obvious stagnation and socio-economic distress. After more than a half century of increasing openness, nearly all regions in the north and south are experiencing alarming and seemingly ever worsening inequality and often painfully disruptive adjustment in work, civic and private lives. In the wake of these developments, the forces unleashed by the globalization project now seem to be pushing toward its recalibration. Economic success in Asia, especially in China, has shifted global power relations and alliances, challenging the premier position of the US. Recently, populist and authoritarian movements in many global regions have channeled reactions to globalization’s disruptive qualities into political challenges to the basic practices and governance architectures undergirding globalization both domestically and transnationally. Today, at nearly every level of social life across the globe, social, economic and political relations, practices and modes of organization and governance have been unsettled and destabilized.

How should we make sense of the current moment? Exhaustion, rage, reaction, reform, transformation and experimentation all seem to be present and intermingling in turbulent and unpredictable ways. The 2018 annual SASE conference in Kyoto will serve as an occasion for existing SASE networks, as well as new groupings in the form of mini-conferences, to explore the ways in which the processes of reordering occurring across the globe are impacting traditional research areas and paradigms of analysis. How are new developments redrawing the practice and governance terrain within firms and corporations, in management practices, in the welfare state, the law, in industrial relations, across supply chains and in regulation? Are processes of innovation and technological change substantively affected by (or even driving) the current process of global reordering? SASE as a community has long embraced values furthering equality, justice and democracy across a broad array of research terrains. How do reordering processes impact those commitments? The Association’s first meeting in Asia, itself an expression of the changing composition of the global academic conversation, seems like a very fitting occasion for reflection on these powerful dynamics of change and recomposition.

Calls for paper proposals and session proposals will open on 7 November 2017.

President: Gary Herrigel (g-herrigel@uchicago.edu)

Program Directors: Gary Herrigel and Sebastien Lechevalier

Program Committee: Mary Gallagher and Tobias Schulze-Cleven

Local Organizing Committee: Tadashi Yagi, Masayo Fujimoto, and Sayaka Sakoda

 

Call for Papers in Japanese

Mini-Conference Themes

Each mini-conference will consist of 3 to 6 panels, which will be featured as a separate stream in the program. Each panel will have a discussant, meaning that selected participants must submit a completed paper in advance, by 1 May 2018. Submissions for panels will be open to all scholars on the basis of an extended abstract. If a paper proposal cannot be accommodated within a mini-conference, organizers will forward it to the most appropriate research network as a regular submission.

Comparative Political Economy and the Environment
detailed info
Organizers
Matthew Allen
Jared Finnegan
Geoffrey Wood
Global Finance: Hidden and Public Dimensions
detailed info
Organizers
Karin Knorr-Cetina
Alex Preda
Inclusive Growth and Social Investment: What Prospects For Equality, Democracy and Justice?
detailed info
Organizers
Jean-Michel Bonvin
Francesco Laruffa
Kang-Kook Lee
Keun Lee
Hyeog Ug Kwon
Marketization and the Digital Economy
detailed info
Organizers
Thomas Beauvisage
Jean-Samuel Beuscart
Dave Elder-Vass
Timur Ergen
Anne Jourdain
Sidonie Naulin
Politics of the Future, Policies in the Present
detailed info
Organizers
Vincent Cardon
Antoine Bernard de Raymond
Olivier Pilmis
Professional Networks and Expert Numbers in Economic Governance
detailed info
Organizers
Daniel Mügge
Leonard Seabrooke
Prospects for Equality Within and Across Organizations
detailed info
Organizers
Nina Bandelj
Andrew Penner
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey
Revisiting Nonliberal Capitalism: Germany and Japan Ten Years After the Great Financial Crisis
detailed info
Organizers
Lea Elsässer
Timur Ergen
Daniel Mertens
Martin Seeliger
Socio-Economic Justice, Equality, SDGs and the Constituting of Participatory Society: The Islamic Moral Economy & Finance Project
detailed info
Organizers
Mehmet Asutay
Necati Aydin
Shinsuke Nagaoka
State Rescaling, Spatial Austerity and the Globalization of Urban Decline: in Search of Alternative Urban Policies
detailed info
Organizers
Yasushi Asami
Sophie Baudet-Michel
Sophie Buhnik
Peter Matanle
Allan Popelard
The Making of Transnational Labor Markets: Reordering of Actors, Institutions, and Policies?
detailed info
Organizers
Ursula Mense-Petermann
Karen Shire

Find out more about the exceptional scholars giving featured talks at our 30th anniversary conference in Kyoto.

Ching Kwan Lee
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Emiko Ochiai
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Christine Parker
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Wang Hui
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Submissions Info

Once logged into sase.org, simply click on the green “Submit A Paper” button in the top right-hand corner of the SASE website to begin the submission process. If you need to create an online profile for the first time, click the “Join Us” button.

Click Here for detailed submission instructions.

Tourism

Kyoto and its surroundings hold a panoply of historical sites, restaurants, museums and more. Here is a basic overview of some of the most scintillating experiences the Kansai region has to offer:

For a more detailed view of things to do in and around Kyoto, check out the 16 areas at the bottom of this webpage.

Those of you who are able to venture a bit further afield should also consider visiting Nara, where red deer will happily eat from your hand, and Mie, a center of the traditional pearl trade.

 

For even more information, visit jnto.go.jp/eng